Employment status, the ‘gig economy’ and ‘art educators’ at the National Gallery

Employment status, the ‘gig economy’ and ‘art educators’ at the National Gallery

Recent high-profile Employment Tribunals about employment status include cases involving Pimlico Plumbers, Uber, CitySprint and Deliveroo. These all involved workers in the private sector. But precarious terms and conditions of employment affect workers in public sector institutions too, either through outsourcing, or through long-term anomalies.

For decades art educators at the National Gallery in London welcomed school tours and visitors, gave talks, workshops and offered information about the history of the Gallery and the art on display. The people that did these jobs had their employment terminated in late 2017, and some of them were offered the opportunity to apply for vacancies, reportedly on lesser terms and conditions. The employment status of the original art educators is the subject of an Employment Tribunal claim as 27 of them, (the NG27), are seeking to get their status as employees recognised.

It will probably be a high-profile case. Obviously, every claim that goes to an Employment Tribunal is unique, but precarious employment is commonplace in the heritage sector, so it is a case that is worth following and supporting.

The NG27 are fund-raising to pay the legal costs of taking their claim to Employment Tribunal. Following a preliminary hearing on 16 July, their 8-day hearing will start on 26 November 2018. The target is to raise £65,000. They have already raised more than half of the target.

https://www.crowdjustice.com/case/nationalgalleryeducators/

There is an online auction of art works with all proceeds going towards the campaign
https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/nationalgallery27/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from=

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